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Diabetes: This disease can get out of control after an accident

Monica Vaklinova

5 min reading time

15-08-2020

Title:Diabetes: This disease can get out of control after an accident
Headline:Diabetes: This disease can get out of control after an accidentAuthor:

15-08-2020
Dianurse.com - BG

Diabetes: This disease can get out of control after an accident


Description:The Dianurse Team presents Lee, a 57 old man living in the UK. Lee was a former career professional who had to take early retirement. A few years ago, an accident forced Lee’s diabetes to go out of control. Over the years after this accident, Lee experienced multiple life-threatening episodes. He is currently physically disabled and suffers from mood swings, deep depression, and anxiety. He works hard each day to stay positive and to deal with the daily effects of diabetes.
Image:https://images.ctfassets.net/wv9nw02wyyx8/1CFIj9NvG5GlauJg8uZ2fQ/4e9c6701e30322e8b3e0e04754ae93c1/questions-3145370_640.jpg?w=500&q=100

Diabetes: This disease can get out of control after an accident

Who this story is about?

The Dianurse Team presents Lee, a 57 old man living in the UK. Lee was a former career professional who had to take early retirement. A few years ago, an accident forced Lee’s diabetes to go out of control. Over the years after this accident, Lee experienced multiple life-threatening episodes. He is currently physically disabled and suffers from mood swings, deep depression, and anxiety. He works hard each day to stay positive and to deal with the daily effects of diabetes. Lee was kind to share episodes from his diabetes journey with our readers.

First diabetes experience

Dianurse: For how long do you suffer from diabetes? Lee: Since 2007 although I was likely to have contracted a few years earlier I was told.

Dianurse: How did you realize it? How did you start your diabetes journey? Lee: Started with constant going to the toilet and thirst for some time and then one morning I woke up and just felt really ill. Really bad so I went to a walk-in clinic here in the UK and they took a urine sample and straight away told me that I was diabetic and to go straight to my doctor. So I went to my Doctor and that is how my journey started.

Dianurse: Did you know what diabetes was and how to act with it? Lee: Yes I did know what it was but was not sure or aware of how to act or deal with it.

About biggest fears …

Dianurse: What were your biggest fears at that time? Lee: That I would not be able to do a lot of the things I enjoyed, and that it would affect all my daily life routines.

How to manage diabetes

Dianurse: What’s the best way to manage diabetes, based on your experience? Lee: Before my accident, I found exercise and being mobile as much as I can. Eating little and often and reduce salt, sugar, and carbs. Also to get up regularly and not sit for too long in the day.

Dianurse: Tell us more about your lifestyle, diet, and fitness/sport activities? Lee: Before I was diabetic I used to play ice hockey at the top level and also enjoyed playing rugby union and table tennis. I worked out at the gym every other day, from the age of 14. I was naturally a physically built and super fit person. My diet was very protein-based with a mixture of carbs, vegetables, and fruits, but more protein-based. After I was diagnosed, I started to consume fewer carbs, fruits, acid type sugars, general sugar, and salts.

Dianurse: What is your favorite dish and why? Lee: I never had a favorite dish as such but if I went out I always loved a pizza, can’t explain why! Sorry… That said I do love sirloin steaks.

Dianurse: What would be the best/most effective way to keep your blood sugar in the healthy range, again based on your experience? Lee: Reduce food intake, reduce sugar gradually not too quickly, everything should be done sensibly. Try to move and exercise regularly and drink plenty of water. Again start all these things gradually, so the body can adjust. If you take insulin, make sure you take it as directed and always have enough in stock. Keeping mentally strong and fighting negative thoughts is a must, so find something to focus which can help stop depression.

About diabetes and tech nology

Dianurse: Technology is rapidly penetrating healthcare. There are literally thousands of apps capable to track vital signs of humans, or simply data loggers ( carbs, blood glucose, etc.). What would be the added value of these technology advances for diabetics? How technology can help diabetics to effectively control their diabetes? Lee: I think the more intelligent they become through identifying how you need to control it is a good thing, but also to provide a better understanding of nutrition and food values. By supplying a more personal analysis per individual based on their food and lifestyle choices I believe would be a great asset.

Dianurse: What do you think about the constant connectivity that tele-health app brings to both diabetics and healthcare providers? Lee: Not sure what tele-health apps are … However, being connected is only useful if it can work for the specific individual as we are all different and some of us, like me, have so many life-threatening and serious complications, while others do not. Also, taking into account depression, anxiety, etc. again that is where I believe a lot more ongoing research and work are needed.

About inspiration

Dianurse: How can you inspire others to take better care of themselves and their diabetes? Lee: I learned that an accident changed my life forever as a result of being diabetic. My first tip would be to learn as much as you can. Speak to others or maybe join a local group to share experiences and learn from. Do not take it for granted as it can be life or death and miserable in-between existence. Ask for a doctor who is a Diabetic specialist. Make sure you regularly check your blood sugar and if you have a monitor check it regularly throughout the day. Keep a journal of your Daily/Weekly habits no matter what happens and use to try to combat all the bad mistakes by learning from your diary. I think one of the most underrated issues is the lack of speaking about it. Talk to your loved ones, friends, family, etc. It is okay if you’re having a bad time as others can help if they understand as well.

For the author:

Monica is a marketing maanger at Dianurse and a blogger.

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